4 Tips to Conquer the Afternoon Crash

Imagine yourself on a typical day, finishing lunch and gearing up for what should be a productive afternoon. Just as you start to tackle the next item on your list, you’re hit with a sudden wave of drowsiness that leaves you nodding off despite your best efforts to stay focused.

If you can relate to this experience, you know that an “afternoon crash” can have a big impact on your day. The afternoon crash is shown to affect elite athletes, resulting in slower race times midafternoon compared to performances at other times of the day (1).

Researchers generally refer to it as “the post-lunch dip,” when many people experience low energy, drowsiness, and reduced performance in the midafternoon hours. It’s clear that what you choose to eat for lunch can either ease your sleepiness or make it worse, but research has shown that lunch is not the primary cause of the post-lunch dip.

In part, biology is to blame. Low energy and drowsiness in the midafternoon is part of the body’s normal circadian rhythm (2). Research examining physiological measures related to sleep, such as patterns of electrical activity in the brain, show a peak in the midafternoon hours (3, 4). These measures show that body systems prepare for sleep during the post-lunch hours of the day, often causing you to feel like you need a nap.

Biology is an important factor, but research has shown that lifestyle and nutrition choices play an important role, too. These choices might make the difference between a productive afternoon or an afternoon of nodding off at your desk.

Here are four tips supported by scientific research to help you conquer the afternoon crash.

1. Start With Sleep
It goes without saying that too little sleep at night will result in feeling tired during the day. Unfortunately, we may not always make sleep a priority, which can have a negative impact on both our productivity and well-being (5). The first step to overcoming your afternoon slump is to ensure you’re getting the recommended seven to nine hours of sleep each night.

2. Choose a Better Lunch
Eating a large fatty or starchy meal is a common trigger that makes afternoon drowsiness much worse. Research suggests that the type of high-calorie, fatty meal you might find at a drive-thru restaurant can significantly increase afternoon sleepiness and impair performance of everyday tasks such as driving (6). Other research indicates that a fatty or starchy lunch can negatively impact mood and cognitive performance (7).

3. Keep Caffeine Use Moderate
Caffeine can help to boost energy levels, alertness, and focus when used moderately. However, excessive caffeine use may make an afternoon crash worse since the effects of a morning caffeine jolt fade around the same time as midafternoons sleepiness is at its peak (8). Consuming too much caffeine late in the day can interfere with sleep at night.  Individual sensitivity to caffeine varies, but 400 milligrams of caffeine per day, or the equivalent of three to five cups of coffee is considered moderate and compatible with a healthful diet (9).

4. Get Moving
If your day is spent in front of a computer screen, then it’s likely that you spend a lot of time sitting. Prolonged periods of sitting can be a factor that contributes to afternoon sleepiness. Research suggests that the more breaks you take from sitting, the less tired you may feel in the afternoon. In one study, research participants who broke up periods of sitting with short, light-intensity walking for three minutes every half hour were significantly less fatigued later in the day compared to when they stayed seated for long periods (10).

While the body’s natural circadian rhythms are part of the reason why many of us feel low on energy in the midafternoon hours, diet and lifestyle choices have a big influence, too. Getting adequate sleep at night, choosing more healthful lunch options, moderating caffeine use, and breaking up your day with movement are all effective strategies to help you conquer your afternoon slump.

References

  1. Monk TH. The post-lunch dip in performance. Clin Sports Med. 2005. Apr;24(2):e15-23, xi-xii
  2. Bes F, Jobert M, Schulz H. Modeling napping, post-lunch dip, and other variations in human sleep propensity. Sleep. 2009 Mar;32(3):392-8.
  3. Carskadon MA, Dement WC. Multiple sleep latency tests during the constant routine. Sleep. 1992;15:396–9.
  4. Lack LC, Lushington K. The rhythms of human sleep propensity and core body temperature. J Sleep Res. 1996 Mar;5(1):1-11.
  5. Jean-Louis G, Williams NJ, Sarpong D, Pandey A, Youngstedt S, Zizi F, Ogedegbe G. Associations between inadequate sleep and obesity in the US adult population: analysis of the national health interview survey (1977-2009). BMC Public Health. 2014 Mar 29;14:290.
  6. Reyner LA, Wells SJ, Mortlock V, Horne JA. ‘Post-lunch’ sleepiness during prolonged, monotonous driving – effects of meal size. Physiol Behav. 2012 Feb 28;105(4):1088-91.
  7. Lloyd HM, Green MW, Rogers PJ. Mood and cognitive performance effects of isocaloric lunches differing in fat and carbohydrate content. Physiol Behav. 1994 Jul;56(1):51-7.
  8. Lelo A, Birkett DJ, Robson RA, Miners JO. Comparative pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its primary demethylated metabolites paraxanthine, theobromine and theophylline in man. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1986 Aug;22(2):177-82.
  9. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. Part A. Executive summary. Accessed on 20 Apr 2018. Available at: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/02-executive-summary.asp
  10. Wennberg P, Boraxbekk CJ, Wheeler M, Howard B, Dempsey PC, Lambert G, Eikelis  N, Larsen R, Sethi P, Occleston J, Hernestål-Boman J, Ellis KA, Owen N, Dunstan DW. Acute effects of breaking up prolonged sitting on fatigue and cognition: a pilot study. BMJ Open. 2016 Feb 26;6(2):e009630.

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Isagenix Millionaire Wears Multiple Hats

Isagenix Millionaire Wears Multiple Hats


Jennifer Cross Trinkner is a proud mother, a ferocious worker, and a fitness competitor ? all while building up her Isagenix business to 13-Star Platinum. She shares how to get started, help increase enrollments, and what it takes to soar in this business.

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Product Review: Isagenix



Welcome to the Will-Powered YouTube Channel! We will be uploading Workout videos every Wednesday, Diet videos every Friday, and Lifestyle videos every …

Ingredient Spotlight: Wolfberry – Isagenix Health

Although first described 2,000 years ago, the use of wolfberry in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formulas was revived at the end of the Empire of the Great Ming (1368–1644). The benefits of wolfberry to modulate stress and support faster post-exercise recovery have been confirmed by modern science, with water-soluble polysaccharides (LBPs) and other antioxidants in the fruit also managing free radicals to support healthy aging (1, 2, 3).

But what is wolfberry and goji berry, and why are there several species reported in the literature? “Wolfberry” and “goji berry” are synonyms (2). The plant genus Lycium, to which wolfberry belongs, has about 80 species distributed in Asia, South America, and southern Africa. Of seven species growing in China, the two species that are most commonly used interchangeably in TCM are L. barbarum and L. chinense, also known as gou qi or kei tze (2). L. barbarum has been the best studied.

The wolfberry fruit has been used in China for more than 2,000 years, and recorded in the Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing, the Divine Farmer’s Classic of Materia Medica, compiled in the first century CE (2, 3, 4). Wolfberry is one of the top 120 herbs in that book, believed to have remarkable health benefits and safety for strengthening the body, keeping it fit, prolonging life, and easing life through all the seasons (1, 2, 3, 4). Its reputation has extended to other traditional medicines in Asia, Taiwan, Japan, and Korea, where wolfberry is used for general debility (1, 2). Additional indications listed in authoritative books include supporting blood sugar control and visual health (1, 2).

Dried wolfberry fruit used in products has alkaloids, chlorogenic acid, carotenoids, amino acids, terpenes, vitamins, and polysaccharides. Some studies suggest the polysaccharides, extracted with hot water, are the main bioactive constituents (2, 3, 4). LBPs support general antioxidative effects and maintenance of blood sugar and lipid levels. For vision health, the carotenoid zeaxanthin is also required (1, 2). Human clinical trials focused on the effects of wolfberry and its polysaccharides on blood sugar and lipid levels, immune health, antioxidant effects, vision, weight management, general well-being, and as a tonic for fatigue and stress (2, 5, 6, 7, 8).

Positive Health Benefits of Wolfberry Polysaccharides

A prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study of 67 individuals examined the effects of wolfberry polysaccharides on postprandial glucose and lipid levels. People were given either 300 mg of polysaccharides or placebo (2, 5). The group taking the polysaccharides experienced improved blood sugar and lipid support after intervention, compared to baseline (2, 5).

Several clinical studies demonstrated the positive effects of a daily serving of a L. barbarum supplement standardized to supply a polysaccharide equivalent of at least 150 g of fresh fruit on general health (6), as an immune modulator (7), on modulating antioxidant defenses (8), caloric expenditure, reducing fatigue after exercise (10), and, on weight control decreasing waist circumference in healthy overweight men and women (9). A tendency toward improved short-term memory and focus was found on older adults (55-72 years old). The study also confirmed that those who consumed wolfberry had supporting mental health and immunity benefits (6).

The study also demonstrated antioxidant effects through increases of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) along with a reduction of  markers of oxidative stress. These results suggest wolfberry protects against free radicals contributing to cardiovascular and brain health (2).

Wolfberry extracts, packed with polysaccharides, have also demonstrated they can increase thermogenesis, postprandial energy expenditure, and have positive effects on waist circumference and other weight assessment such as BMI, and total body fat (2, 9). Wolfberry showed benefits reducing fatigue and improving exercise performance, by increasing significantly VO2 max, a measure of the maximum volume of oxygen that an athlete can use (10). A study also suggests the consumption of wolfberry may provide adaptability to physical stressors (such as exercise) (2, 10).

The Safety of Wolfberry

No side effects have been reported in monographs and clinical trials at the amounts of wolfberry usually recommended (1, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10). The amount of wolfberry used in Isagenix products is within those reported in the literature, and therefore can be safely consumed.

Isagenix Ionix Supreme has the Power of Wolfberry

Isagenix offers Ionix® Supreme with the health benefits of water-soluble polysaccharides from wolfberry fruit. The number of polysaccharides in a serving of Ionix Supreme is within those reported in the literature, and therefore can be safely consumed. Ionix Supreme is individually adjusted, starting with half to one teaspoon a day based on what works best for you.

The Isagenix no-compromise quality standards include the use of carefully sourced raw materials that undergo stringent analytical testing procedures to detect the presence of contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals, and microbes. Isagenix wolfberry fruit extract is made using a hot water extraction process, which replicates the traditional hot water brew preparation of traditional Asian medicines used for centuries around the world.

References

  1. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, and Jaenicke C. PDR for Herbal Medicines. Medical Economics Company, Inc. 2000. Montvale, NY.
  2. Engels G, Brinckmann J, Lycium (Goji Berry) Lycium barbarum and L. chinense Family: Solanaceae HerbalGram. 2017, 113: 8-18.
  3. Bucheli P, Gao Q, Redgwell R. Vidal K. Wang J. and Zhang W. Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects of Chinese Wolfberry In: Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition, Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, editors. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, 2011.
  4. Khan IA, Abourashed EA, Leung’s Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics. Third edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 2010.
  5. Cai H LF, Zuo P, Huang G, et al. Practical application of antidiabetic efficacy of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide in patients with type 2 diabetes. Med. Chem. 2015;11:383-390.
  6. Amagase H, Nance DM. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study of the general effects of a standardized Lycium barbarum (goji) juice, GoChi. J Altern Complement Med. 2008;14(4):403-412.
  7. Amagase H SB, Nance DM. Immunomodulatory effects of Lycium barbarum fruit juice in Chinese older healthy human subjects. J Med Food. 2009;12(5):1159-1165.
  8. Amagase H, Sun B, Borek C. Lycium barbarum (goji) juice improves in vivo antioxidant biomarkers in serum of healthy adults. Nutr Res. 2009;29(1):19-25.
  9. Amagase H, Nance DM. Lycium barbarum increases caloric expenditure and decreases waist circumference in healthy overweight men and women: pilot study. J Am Coll Nutr. 2011;30(5):304-309.
  10. Amagase H, Nance DM. Lycium barbarum fruit (goji) attenuates the adrenal steroid response to an exercise challenge and the feeling of tiredness: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human clinical study. J. Food Res. 2012;1(2).
  11. Cheng CY, Chung WY, Szeto YT, Benzie IFF. Fasting plasma zeaxanthin response to Fructus barbarum L. (wolfberry; kei tze) in a food-based human supplementation trial. Brit. J. Nutrit.. 2007;93(01):123.

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Is Isagenix A Scam? ABC News Review of Isagenix



http://lose7-15.com. Is Isagenix a scam? Here is a ABC News video that reviews Isagenix products. You will that that the “Isagenix scam” or that Isagenix …

3 Month UPDATE!!! HONEST REVIEW ISAGENIX! Good, bad and ugly!



Hi guys! Here is the update from my previous video 🙂 Hope it helps you all on your weight loss journey.

Fitness Cover Model Shares Her Story

Fitness Cover Model Shares Her Story


Personal trainer and Isagenix business builder Rita Catolino grew up in an Italian family where food was often the focus. As she got older, Rita put on extra weight, and decided she wanted to make a personal change and set an example once she gave birth to her daughter. Always obsessed with magazines like Oxygen, Rita looked at an issue one day and made a promise to herself that she would eventually grace their cover. Rita never intended to use Isagenix products when she joined the company, but simply wanted to take advantage of the business opportunity and earn extra income. Once she tried the products at the urging of her sponsor, she was sold. Rita quickly embraced the no-compromise products and the Isagenix lifestyle. After years of hard work, sculpting her body, and focusing on how she felt instead of the number on the scale, Rita finally got her Oxygen cover.
Press play on this podcast to hear Rita’s story of how she went from an overweight girl to a healthy and toned mother and Isagenix business builder.

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